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Factorial of N

0 likes • Nov 19, 2022 • 0 views
Python
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print colored text to IDE terminal

0 likes • Jun 1, 2023 • 0 views
Python
from colorama import init, Fore
# Initialize colorama
init()
print(Fore.RED + "This text is in red color.")
print(Fore.GREEN + "This text is in green color.")
print(Fore.BLUE + "This text is in blue color.")
# Reset colorama
print(Fore.RESET + "This text is back to the default color.")

Bitonic sort

0 likes • Nov 19, 2022 • 0 views
Python
# Python program for Bitonic Sort. Note that this program
# works only when size of input is a power of 2.
# The parameter dir indicates the sorting direction, ASCENDING
# or DESCENDING; if (a[i] > a[j]) agrees with the direction,
# then a[i] and a[j] are interchanged.*/
def compAndSwap(a, i, j, dire):
if (dire==1 and a[i] > a[j]) or (dire==0 and a[i] > a[j]):
a[i],a[j] = a[j],a[i]
# It recursively sorts a bitonic sequence in ascending order,
# if dir = 1, and in descending order otherwise (means dir=0).
# The sequence to be sorted starts at index position low,
# the parameter cnt is the number of elements to be sorted.
def bitonicMerge(a, low, cnt, dire):
if cnt > 1:
k = cnt/2
for i in range(low , low+k):
compAndSwap(a, i, i+k, dire)
bitonicMerge(a, low, k, dire)
bitonicMerge(a, low+k, k, dire)
# This funcion first produces a bitonic sequence by recursively
# sorting its two halves in opposite sorting orders, and then
# calls bitonicMerge to make them in the same order
def bitonicSort(a, low, cnt,dire):
if cnt > 1:
k = cnt/2
bitonicSort(a, low, k, 1)
bitonicSort(a, low+k, k, 0)
bitonicMerge(a, low, cnt, dire)
# Caller of bitonicSort for sorting the entire array of length N
# in ASCENDING order
def sort(a,N, up):
bitonicSort(a,0, N, up)
# Driver code to test above
a = [3, 7, 4, 8, 6, 2, 1, 5]
n = len(a)
up = 1
sort(a, n, up)
print ("\n\nSorted array is")
for i in range(n):
print("%d" %a[i]),

Hello World

0 likes • Sep 9, 2023 • 11 views
Python
print("test")

UNT CSCE 2100 Assignment 6

0 likes • Nov 18, 2022 • 0 views
Python
"""
Assignment 6
The goal is to make a graph of
who bit who and who was bitten.
There should be 10 nodes and 15 edges.
3 arrows of biting each other and
3 arrows of someone biting themselves.
Networkx can not do self biting
arrows, but it is in the code.
"""
from graphviz import Digraph as DDotGraph
from graphviz import Graph as UDotGraph
import networkx as nx
from networkx.algorithms.dag import transitive_closure
import graphviz as gv
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
from numpy.linalg import matrix_power
"""
class DGraph:
def __init__(self):
self.d = dict()
def clear(self):
self.d = dict()
def add_node(self,n):
if not self.d.get(n):
self.d[n] = set()
def add_edge(self,e):
f,t=e
self.add_node(f)
self.add_node(t)
vs=self.d.get(f)
if not vs:
self.d[f] = {t}
else:
vs.add(t)
def add_edges_from(self,es):
for e in es:
self.add_edge(e)
def edges(self):
for f in self.d:
for t in self.d[f]:
yield (f,t)
def number_of_nodes(self):
return len(self.d)
def __repr__(self):
return self.d.__repr__()
def show(self):
dot = gv.Digraph()
for e in self.edges():
#print(e)
f, t = e
dot.edge(str(f), str(t), label='')
#print(dot.source)
show(dot)
# displays graph with graphviz
def show(dot, show=True, file_name='graph.gv'):
dot.render(file_name, view=show)
def showGraph(g,label="",directed=True):
if directed:
dot = gv.Digraph()
else:
dot = gv.Graph()
for e in g.edges():
print(e)
f, t = e
dot.edge(str(f), str(t), label=label)
print(dot.source)
show(dot)
def bit():
G = DGraph()
G.add_edge(("Blade","Samara"))
G.add_edge(("Shadow","Wolfe"))
G.add_edge(("Raven", "Austin"))
G.add_edge(("Blade", "Alice"))
G.add_edge(("Alice","Brandon"))
G.add_edge(("Blade", "Wolfe"))
G.add_edge(("Samara", "Robin"))
G.add_edge(("Samara", "Raven"))
G.add_edge(("Samara", "Hamed"))
G.add_edge(("Wolfe", "Blade"))
G.add_edge(("Hamed", "Samara"))
G.add_edge(("Wolfe", "Shadow"))
G.add_edge(("Brandon", "Brandon"))
G.add_edge(("Hamed", "Hamed"))
G.add_edge(("Austin", "Austin"))
showGraph(G, label="bit")
bit()
def bitten():
G=DGraph()
G.add_edge(("Samara","Blade"))
G.add_edge(("Wolfe","Shadow"))
G.add_edge(("Austin", "Raven"))
G.add_edge(("Alice","Blade"))
G.add_edge(("Brandon", "Alice"))
G.add_edge(("Wolfe", "Blade" ))
G.add_edge(("Robin", "Samara"))
G.add_edge(("Raven", "Samara"))
G.add_edge(("Hamed", "Samara"))
G.add_edge(("Blade", "Wolfe"))
G.add_edge(("Samara", "Hamed"))
G.add_edge(("Shadow", "Wolfe"))
G.add_edge(("Brandon", "Brandon"))
G.add_edge(("Hamed", "Hamed"))
G.add_edge(("Austin", "Austin"))
showGraph(G, label="bitten by")
#bitten()
family = ["Blade", "Samara", "Shadow", "Wolfe", "Raven", "Alice"]
"""
#Do transitive closure call out and the
#matrix power operation should be the same
D = nx.DiGraph()
#D.add_nodes_from("SamaraBladeWolfeShadowAliceRavenBrandonRobinHamedAustin")
D.add_edge("Blade","Samara")
D.add_edge("Shadow","Wolfe")
D.add_edge("Raven", "Austin")
D.add_edge("Blade", "Alice")
D.add_edge("Alice","Brandon")
D.add_edge("Blade", "Wolfe")
D.add_edge("Samara", "Robin")
D.add_edge("Samara", "Raven")
D.add_edge("Samara", "Hamed")
D.add_edge("Wolfe", "Blade")
D.add_edge("Hamed", "Samara")
D.add_edge("Wolfe", "Shadow")
D.add_edge("Brandon", "Brandon")
D.add_edge("Hamed", "Hamed")
D.add_edge("Austin", "Austin")
T = transitive_closure(D)
for e in D.edges(): print(e)
for n in D.nodes(): print(n)
def show(H):
nx.draw(H, with_labels=True, font_weight='bold')
plt.show()
#Use nx.to_numpy_matrix instead of nx.adjacency_matrix
# M = nx.adjacency_matrix(D)
# MT = nx.adjacency_matrix(T)
M = nx.to_numpy_matrix(D)
MT = nx.to_numpy_matrix(T)
M2 = M@M
def mPower(M, k): #M is numpy matrix
assert k >= 1
P = M
for _ in range(k):
P = P @ M
return P
def tc(M):
#compute transitive closure
pass
D1 = nx.DiGraph(M)
D2 = nx.DiGraph(M2)
print('Matrix for Original\n', M)
N = nx.to_numpy_array(D,dtype=int)
print('np_array for Original\n', N)
print('\nMatrix for Transitive Closure\n', MT)
N2 = nx.to_numpy_array(T,dtype=int)
print('np_array for Transitive Closure\n', N2)
show(D) #can use D, T, and numpy matrix power operation
show(T)
show(T)

Create a Pascal’s Triangle

0 likes • May 31, 2023 • 0 views
Python
def generate_pascals_triangle(num_rows):
triangle = []
for row in range(num_rows):
# Initialize the row with 1
current_row = [1]
# Calculate the values for the current row
if row > 0:
previous_row = triangle[row - 1]
for i in range(len(previous_row) - 1):
current_row.append(previous_row[i] + previous_row[i + 1])
# Append 1 at the end of the row
current_row.append(1)
# Add the current row to the triangle
triangle.append(current_row)
return triangle
def display_pascals_triangle(triangle):
for row in triangle:
for number in row:
print(number, end=" ")
print()
# Prompt the user for the number of rows
num_rows = int(input("Enter the number of rows for Pascal's Triangle: "))
# Generate Pascal's Triangle
pascals_triangle = generate_pascals_triangle(num_rows)
# Display Pascal's Triangle
display_pascals_triangle(pascals_triangle)

Copy file to destination

0 likes • Nov 18, 2022 • 1 view
Python
# importing the modules
import os
import shutil
# getting the current working directory
src_dir = os.getcwd()
# printing current directory
print(src_dir)
# copying the files
shutil.copyfile('test.txt', 'test.txt.copy2') #copy src to dst
# printing the list of new files
print(os.listdir())